KIKO 3: ALAE & APAPANE

This design speaks of what I think the quality of these two birds are. The Alae is a bird that is known to be rude, kolohe and gives the rascal feeling. I invite you to Google the story of the Alae bird in Hawaiian culture. The Apapane to me is more a bird that holds humility and patience. So when you put the two together, you have a balance. One is kolohe, one is humble. Duality. The design mimics the image of a fish net. For the MAMo show, I made a feathered cape out of nylon rope. The first thing I had to do was make the cape by netting the cordage. But after almost half way done, I realized I did it wrong and had to remove all the knots I made and start over. That was very frustrating, like the net was the "rudeness" because after all that time and effort, I had to go back to square one. As frustrating as it was and painful to my fingers, the finished product is awesome and way better than what it would have been. The process taught me patience and humility because I had to go through it. So to me, this experience reminds me of these two birds. 
The main point of this design is that with every challenge in life comes something great on the other side! So no give up. Just give um!

KIKO 2: PULELEHUA & PINAO


This design represents both the butterfly and dragonfly. Even though it's speaks of them, the design goes deeper and speaks of my interpretation of the 2. For me, the butterfly (pulelehua) represents new life, second chances, and learning from your mistakes. When the caterpillar goes through its transition and turns into a butterfly, he gets a new life. So to me, that what I think about. The dragonfly (pinao) to me represents our kūpuna. One day, I wrote a chant about honoring and asking our kūpuna for knowledge and kōkua. It came to me from walking around the lo'i kalo (taro patch)and watching a dragonfly fly from one kalo to another, spending some time on each leaf like he was a kupuna keeping an eye on everything. So to me, a dragonfly represents the opportunity for connection. 


The design represents a balance of the 2. It actually resembles a drinking straw in a cup of ice water. When you super thirsty, you want to drink the most coldest, refreshing water. I have learned that if you keep the straw all the way in the cup and drink from the bottom, the water is the warmest. But if you raise the straw to the top of the cup and you drink the water surrounding the ice cubes, you get the coldest water to drink. It might be a weird interpretation and analogy, but to me that's an example of learning from your past, like the meaning of the butterfly. But if you always follow your na'au (your gut), your kūpuna and God will always guide you (like a dragonfly). I hope it makes sense. My mind and Na'au work in weird ways. But that's what comes to me.

KIKO 4: MAMO & ʻŌʻŌ


This design represents the creation of both the Mamo and 'Ō'ō birds. These birds carried both black and yellow feathers, however the yellow are very little bit. Because yellow is very hard to aquire, this color is a very royal and powerful color. The most royal cape is an all yellow one. In the design, the arrows represent all the black feathers and the crescent moon shapes are the little yellow feathers. 
To me, this design represents the beauty of being Hawaiian. Like the rare yellow feathers on a body of black, Hawai'i is a little rich in a big ocean. We are rare yet full of mana. We are proud to be Hawaiian because we know our kuleana.
To me, that's what these birds represent so that what this design represents as well.

KIKO 8: PŌʻELEʻELE & PŌHĀHĀ

This design talks about Pō'ele'ele, the state of complete darkness, just like the state the world came from before God gave light. Pōhāhā is like the action of motion and mystery in that darkness. I image dark grey some rolling in, creating motion in complete darkness. To me, this represents the beginning, that state of which we come from. So the main message of this design to remember our beginnings, to remember our past. No matter where we go in life, our lifeline is our connection to our beginnings. We should always to move forward, we need to look backwards.


The only difference with Kiko 8 from Kiko 1 is the turtle-like design which is a segway into the next section of the Kumulipo (Hawaiian creation story) that speaks of reptiles and crawlers, including turtles. 

KIKO 1: PŌʻELEʻELE & PŌHĀHĀ


This design talks about Pō'ele'ele, the state of complete darkness, just like the state the world came from before God gave light. Pōhāhā is like the action of motion and mystery in that darkness. I image dark grey some rolling in, creating motion in complete darkness. To me, this represents the beginning, that state of which we come from. So the main message of this design to remember our beginnings, to remember our past. No matter where we go in life, our lifeline is our connection to our beginnings. We should always to move forward, we need to look backwards.

KIKO 5:: ʻIO & LUPE


*Moʻolelo coming soon

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KIKO 5:: NĒNĒ & AUKUʻU


*Moʻolelo coming soon

KIKO 7: PUEO & NOIO


*Moʻolelo coming soon