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"Mauna a Wakea" ​ ​


Mauna a Wakea (Mauna Kea) popped into my mind, and from there the ball started to roll. I was having flash backs of my experiences of this beloved land and my aloha for it. Then the next thing that pops into my mind is Aunty Pua Case and Hawane Rios and the love they give to Mauna a Wakea, the piko of our homeland. My aloha and mahalo nui goes out to you 2 and your ʻohana and hoa that give their love and efforts as well. Being on Oʻahu makes it hard to give what mana I can in contribution to the efforts of Mauna a Wakea, but not impossible. I came up with something to show you my love and support for Mauna a Wakea and in hopes that it will get others to support in what ever way they can. Every little bit counts!!!! Here is what my naʻau has to say on my aloha for this piko of ours, this piko of our kūpuna: the petrogylph represents us kanaka individually and what ʻaʻahu (clothing; character) we should be wearing when we go to Mauna a Wakea or discuss it. In my belief and opinion, I believe Mauna a Wakea (which is represented by the black triangle with white tip) is such a sacred land and topic to talk about, it has to be dealt with the up-most respect, and that to me is ʻEkolu Mea Nui; Manaʻoʻiʻo, Manaʻolana, and Aloha. The generic translation to that is Faith, Hope, and Love. But its way more than that. To me its having full aloha for Ke Akua and his creations physically, mentally, and spiritually. So the 3 different designs around Mauna a Wakea represents just that (ʻEkolu Mea Nui). But it is also how we as people should work together to fight for our land.The head has a big circle and smaller white circle. The big circle with black represents Lake Waiau at its peak in history, and the smaller white circle represents its low today, as it sits almost bare. But what it really is talking about is the urge for us kanaka to put on this ʻaʻahu of ʻEkolu Mea Nui (in our own ways and beliefs) and continue to give the respect Mauna a Wakea deserves. Aloha e Mauna a Wakea!!​ Mahalo no Ke Akua

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"Pain"

"Na Hulu o Hula"

This design I call "Na Hulu o Hula", meaning the feathers of hula....at least for me. The 3 designs represent each of my Kumu hula. Left to right, Kumu Kaleo Trinidad, Kumu Taupouri Tangaro, and Kumu Chinky Māhoe. It is feathers like these that create the sight of a beautiful looking bird, the animal that has the mana to fly up in the Heavens. Each design represents the style of my kumus' 'uwehe footstep in their hula style. Kumu Kaleo taught me an 'uwehe that open wide. Kumu Tangaro taught me an 'uwehe that pops straight up and down. And Kumu Chinky taught me an 'uwehe that pops up but flares open too. So this shows the beauty of different styles of hula and also shows that there is no 'one' style that is better than another. They are all beautiful....they are all Hula....they all tell the stories of our kupuna!!!! Mahalo Ke Akua for the kumus you have bestowed upon me. And I pray all my kumus give their purest and warmest Aloha when all 3 of them bless the stage with their presence with their hālau at the Merrie Monarch Festival!!!

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"Peace"

This kiʻi is the outcome of what my naʻau has been feeling for the past month ever since this whole same-sex shainanigans hooplah has been going on. I no like grumble and complain no more. So this is what I came up with. This is for human equality between the religious and the spirituals...between the gays and straight...between man and woman...between your beliefs and the other persons belief...but especially between US HAWAIIANS. stop fighting each other and instead work together. How do we expect to imua as a people if we cant even agree on where to step next? Its all about aloha. The aloha our kūpunas walked with everyday.
THIS IS FOR ALOHA!!!!!
Mahalo Ke Akua!

"Connection"

"Kalaupapa"


This talks about the trip I took with my papa lomi down to Kalaupapa. The mana was so powerful. My na'au found a way to encompass all the mana I felt through my 2 days I was down there. We arrived on da morning of the big swell that was passing through the state last week. The ocean was goin off and the waves were surely dancing. The water was rough like a washer machine. Waves crashing into rocks, spitting salt up in the air creating curtains of haze. You can feel the strength and pure mana that swelled up in the ocean. That feeling was the same feeling I got through the whole trip. Beginning to end.To me, this speaks "Kalaupapa: the schooling grounds for kahunas"; "the birthplace to Lua"; "the land of pure mana."

The story goes right to left because thats the direction the waves went.  The right box represents the swelling of the wave.  The waves were huge, so when the waves would swell, al water would recede exposing rocks in the middle of the bay.  The triangles in the middle box represents the rocks exposed.  The arrows in the triangles represent all the water, salt and mana that sprayed up in the air, resulting in curtains of salt.  The left box represents those curtains of salt, which lined the cliff line and eventually faded the cliff away because of the amount of salt in the air.  This gave me the time to just sit back and watch, listen and reconnect myself with my kūpuna and Akua!  

The main point of the story is that we should all give ourselves a few mins everyday to recenter ourselves, regather and reconnect ourselves before stepping into the responsibilities and distractions of everyday life.  

Mahalo Ke Akua!

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I believe that our kūpuna were masters with something that I think is a lost art today. In everything they did, all the art they practiced, they were able to find that thin line of PONO or balance.  
Balance between what? The duality of everything; Kū and Hina, Male and Female, Strength and Grace, Black and White, Up and Down, Left and Right, Physical and Spiritual, Land and Sea, etc etc. But how did they do that? Why do I think its a lost art today?

This is only my manaʻo, and it may be different for someone else. I think that we think too much today. We try to control things in our lives because of what we think, what we know, what we learned. However, I think sometimes thinking leads us to an unbalanced understanding. To fully understand something, we need not only think, but feel. Tuning into our NAʻAU is focusing to the core of our feelings and to our kūpuna, the naʻau was center of the body and spirit. The naʻau is your connection to Ke Akua and all His mana. It is also your connection to your past and your kūpuna. Our naʻau was so important to our kūpuna that in the practice of Lomilomi or Hawaiian healing through touch and massage, there were many specialists. For example, there were lomi practitioners who only took care of the abdomen, because thats where the naʻau is and they believed that all problems throughout the body connects back to the core, the naʻau. So their kuleana was only the stomach and abdomen.  
Today, I speak for myself too when I say we have a hard time connecting with our naʻau because we too much in our heads. In everything we do, we need a foundation to build upon. To me, I feel that foundation is based off of understanding. To understand means to connect. To connect means thats you are not by yourself. To connect means you are bringing forth your past experiences, your kūpuna, your ʻohana. To connect means that you are finding balance between your thoughts and your feelings. To connect means you are striving to be PONO. Between the dualities of life, you are finding the balance between the two. To connect means you understand your kuleana and your intention is clear.
The 2 black squares represent duality; Kū and Hina, Physical and Spiritual, Mind and Naʻau. The thin line down the middle represent that thin line of PONO, to be balanced between the 2. The dot in the center represents where our kūpuna stood in their work, BALANCED. More than that, the dot represents what we should be striving for in everything that we do. From hula to lomi to teaching to learning to eating to driving, we should be striving to be balanced with ourselves and our character, because if we can, than we are connected to ourselves, connected to our past, and eventually connected to our future.  
Kala mai if this doesn't really make sense. This moʻolelo is very hard to write down. I know exactly what I want to say in my head and naʻau, but to write it down is very difficult. So hopefully the manaʻo successfully comes across.  
I dedicate this design to my kumu, Kumu Chinky Mahoe, and hula braddahs at Hālau ʻo Kawailiʻulā as they start to make their way to Hilo for Merrie Monarch. Its all about connection!

"Lehua" (2nd version)


Story to be posted soon.  

Same story as "Lehua" 1st version

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"Homeless Man" ​


​I walked pass a homeless man surrounded by his bags and there was a rake in the middle of the ground.The black lines represent the rake. The rake represents the hardships that we go through. The things that depresses us. The trails and tribulations. The 3 black triangles represent the man I seen. In actuality, it represents us individually and our life. The background triangles represent the extra ʻukana, baggage, and distractions we deal with. Flip the picture upside down. The rake now turns into a giving hand. A hand of caring, a hand of aloha. A hand to hold onto when all we want is to hold a hand. The man turned into a new keiki sprout. A flower isn't always a pretty sight. It has to start someplace. As a keiki. The hand is caring for the flower. We are the flower. And the background triangles are now butterflies. Butterflies represent new life. We all have something to give. By giving back, caring for, and nurturing ourselves and others, we can make our community a better place.​

Mahalo Ke Akua!

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"Pages"

I've been reading "I Declare" by Joel Osteen, a book that speaks determination in your life. Few days ago, the reading talked about Ke Akua having a plan for all our lives and that everything will work out in detail on His perfect timing. God has written our story already. He knows every challenge, every disappointment. But when we go through these disappointments and challenges, don't stop on that page. Keep moving forward. There's another chapter in front of you, but you have to be willing to walk into it. 
God made us a lot of promises. In our final chapter, we will see His promises come to pass. So until then, don't stop turning your pages!!
I share this as not one who is good at this, but as one who struggles with it. Everyday I have to believe and have faith, and that within itself can be very difficult. But just gotta keep turning the pages!
The 3 triangles represent the turning of the pages. The bar down the middle represents the spine of the book. And to add balance, I added the red pages to represent Kū and the blue pages to represent Hina. The pages changes color represents you continuing to progress in turning your pages. 
Mahalo Ke Akua!

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This design is called "Pain". This is is just my feelings that I felt I needed to express.  I expressed this around mid 2015, talking about the whole issue of the TMT telescope on Mauna Kea.
With all the Mauna Kea challenges going on, I have been dealing with emotional, spiritual and cultural pain because I feel that our ʻāīna should be protected and our Hawaiian culture respected....however I don't see this happening with this government that took control our this land. Those of us who understand we have a kuleana as a beneficiary of this land have been standing up for not just our land, but our kūpuna and our culture. We understand that our culture is unique to this world and will only continue to flourish if WE do something about it. However, the symbol of $ and the word MONEY has grasped its hands around our mentality of todays world and is controlling our people inside and out. Everyone strives to be as rich as they can be, no matter what the consequences are in the future because we only think of "now". We don't care about the future. To me, this is painful. I feel that our ʻāina is being desecrated and destroyed in the name of MONEY. Not science, not education, not research, not culture, not future.....But MONEY. 
My interpretation of this design: the black and red triangles make up a square, and to me this square represents Hawaiʻis land, culture and people. However, MONEY has come to our land and destroyed it in the name of profit and fat wallets. The diagonal line represents the destruction to our land. To me, it represents a slash from a sword and its splitting the square (representing our sacred lands) into 2. To me, its completely disrespectful. 
The reason the diagonal line and bottom triangle is red is because the color represents our blood. The slash is red from slicing our culture and kūpuna with their blade of GREED and MONEY. The bottom triangle is red because our blood drips down. Whatever you do at the top will affect the bottom. You want to destruct and destroy the tallest mountain in Hawaiʻi and the world, you will affect everything below. 
On my recent trip to Beijing, China, I looked out the window as we landed and I seen lines of buildings with blue tarps, lined one by one, covering the land they were built on. The sight I seen as I was landing was eye opening to what happens when people don't treat the LAND with RESPECT! The diagonal line through the square is represented by the rows of buildings that I seen as our plane landed in Beijing. To me, I was thinking that all these buildings all started with 1 building, then 13, then 14, then THOUSANDS!

"Frustration"

This one talks about my frustration with motorcycles zig-zagging in and out of cars and on the line and blow ahead on the freeway. couple days ago, it was 2 or 3 times while i was on the freeway that motorcycle crazy drivers is weaving in between cars, speed up to the butt of the car in front, then book it around and fly it up.
SO, instead of continuing my road rage, i rather turn that negative frustration into something positive and pretty cool looking if i do say so myself. i trip myself out to see what my naʻau really feels.
Mahalo Ke Akua for these creations you give me.

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"Planting Seeds"


This design talks about life and its challenges. We all deal with challenges throughout our life that makes us question ourselves and our potential. After this whole time of running around taking care of my kuleana, I feel everything is finally catching up with me and is becoming overwhelming. At times, I start to question myself.
This is my interpretation of this design:
The big oval represents a oval ball, like a football. This ball represents our journey of our lives. At times, we may feel like a ball being tossed around, full of dizziness and confusing. 
The straight lines represent the ʻāina, our foundation. The dots represent seeds, which are planted under the ʻāina to one day turn into a strong, flourished tree. 
As we walk down our journey of life, we plant seeds for our future. We work hard today to reap the benefits tomorrow. Doing this can become difficult, and many times make us question ourselves. The more life bounces us around, the easier it is to become discouraged. However, not matter how hard the ball get tossed and dropped and kicked around, when it lands on the ground, the seeds will always stay planted under the ʻāina. No matter how our life rolls out, our seeds stay paʻa in the ground because Ke Akua has a plan for us. We may not know or understand what we are doing and why its so difficult at times, but Ke Akua never gives us anything harder than what we can handle. The day that I see my trees and reap the benefits from its fruit, I know it will all be worth it. 
Until then, I continue to plant my trees, 1 seed at a time.
Mahalo Ke Akua!

"Kuleana"

This design is called "KULEANA"

I missed my chance to testify on 7/10/15 at the BLNR meeting about Mauna Kea after waiting for hours because the attorney general pretty much filibustered for an hour talking in circles and going no where with his points, wasting time. So because I couldn't share my testimony then, Im going to share what I was going to say through this design.

"I wear a lot of hats throughout my life; different roles to play. Everyone does, BLNR included. Wear one hat, take care of that responsibility. Take that off, put another hat on and take care of that responsibility....Its consistent. However, giving my testimony, I choose not to wear any hats. I not wearing my politician hat, not wearing my businessman hat, not wearing my educator hat, not even my activist hat. I realized, when I take off all my hats, my skin, my poʻo, my koko, my naʻau, they all say HAWAIIAN. I stand here as a Hawaiian, a Hawaiian who knows, understands and practices my kuleana. To me, thats the biggest and most prominent kuleana out of all the hats I wear here and there.  
To let you know, my kuleana is to protect and perpetuate my culture and my kūpuna. Protect the past, and that will perpetuate us into the future. Giving this testimony, I do not stand alone. My kūpuna stand along side me as well as within me. They are the ones who taught me the sacredness of this ʻāina. They are the ones who taught me about my kuleana as Kamaka Pili. They are the ones who laid down the path for me to walk on today. So I call for them to stand with me.  
So when I see ridiculous things such as DLNR, Gov Ige, UH, and all the greedy businessmen and scientists exploiting our sacred lands and mountain for the sake of money, it is my kuleana to say something and not stay quiet. So I stand here to say that BLNR is WRONG! What this illegal state and government is doing is HEWA! There are no compromises to sacredness. The moment your change something sacred, guess what? It ain't sacred no more!  
I ask BLNR and the state, with that political hat you are wearing, what is your kuleana? Because to my knowledge, your kuleana is to mālama the people. Uh HELLO? Weʻre here. We right here knocking on your door and no one is answering. Better yet, we trying to open the door but you slamming it closed in our faces. Thats not taking care of your responsibility.  
To me, what the state is doing on Mauna a Wākea (especially the toilets) is just like a little child throwing a tantrum because he not getting his way. Our voices are finally starting to be heard, and our people are growing stronger by the heartbeat, and the state can't stand it. So because they know they starting to lose control, they cheat the system and make up their own rules. HEWA! I don't see an emergency here at all. An emergency is people going into our oceans and raping our resources like loli (sea cucumbers). I thank DLNR for putting a temporary ban on that. However, I ask to make that permanent. I don't see ANY emergencies on Mauna a Wākea. Why don't your try to work with us rather than trying to control us?
I ask ALL POLITICIANS to hemo and remove all your hats. Take off all the paid kuleanas you have and tell me, what does your skin say? What does your poʻo, your koko, your naʻau say? What is YOUR kuleana? Your kuleana for yourself, for your ʻohana, your kids, your grandkids? I can promise you your kuleana will change.  
Then and only then will you realize why we Hawaiians WILL NEVER GIVE UP! Because our kuleana stands!  
Kū Kiaʻi Mauna! Eō!"

To me, this design represents our kuleana. Each line and 5 dots represent a hat and a role we play. It is represented by the snap part on the back of a trucker hat. So all the lines and dots represents all the hats that we wear and the responsibilities that comes with that hat. The triangle on the bottom represents myself (or yourself). Its filled in yellow because I believe my kūpuna are best represented with the color yellow. So the triangle represents me and the kuleana the my kūpuna and Ke Akua have instilled within me. No matter what hats I wear, if I take them off, I have a kuleana of my own; to mālama my culture and my kūpuna. That kuleana is most important and I will do whatever it takes to fulfill my responsibilities. I am Hawaiian, and I will act like it!


"Relay"

This design I dedicate to my Aunty April who is a survivor of great cancer.  I know she is a warrior, both to herself but also to Ke Akua.  She is like Xena Warrior Princess to Ke Akua, and I am personally very proud of her.  The design is made up of triangles, but to me they actually represent the "physical" feeling of a shark tooth.  A shark tooth is very sharp and rough, full with serrated edges like a saw.  To me, I imagine thats what her battle (and all cancer warriors) have to battle.  Their life turns into a bumpy, sharp, sore, hard, and challenging life...that is what the 2 dark columns of triangles represent.  The outside columns that fade to gray represent the growth that my Aunty has gone through.  Even though something so negative can be so painful, I always try ("try") to find the positive in it.  Or did a way to make it positive.  This pretty much represents the growth of STRENGTH my Aunty and all cancer warriors gain through this difficult time.  I feel this talks about re-birth...starting fresh...and of course being powered by Ke Akua.  For you Aunty April.  Love You.

Mahalo Ke Akua!!!

Aloha for Puna and "Pele"

Na'au Wala'au Designs wants to share our Aloha for Puna and Pele through our expression of "PELE"The mo'olelo for this ki'i is my personal expressions after watching the video of Mayor Billy Kenoi talking to the Puna community, and I just wanted to share what my na'au went wala'au...First thing came to me was ke ali'i Ruth Ke'elikōlani stopping Pele from reclaiming her land of Hilo back in 1880. Along with other ho'okupu (offerings), the princess threw a red handkerchief into the midst of Pele. The next morning, all seen Hilo saved.The next thing that came to me was Herb Kāne's portrait of Kapi'olani Defying Pele. This happened in 1824 after ke ali'i Kapi'olani walked from Kona to Kīlauea to prove that God was the one true God, and with her continuos faith and belief, she was going to be just fine. Everyone thought she would be killed, but she walked out of the crater unharmed. Then I felt I had to look at some pictures from my humble experiences stepping on Peles doorstep (Kīlauea). The pictures that really stood out were of petroglyphs I visited with couple friends back in college. But the one that really caught my na'au was the one on this design (not red triangle). I honestly don't know what it represents, but through feeling, I think the lines represent Pele's travels, and circles and dots represent kīpukas (islands of trees and plants that were unharmed by lava.). To me, the kīpukas represents the true care and Aloha of Pele, or the element of lava that Ke Akua has provided us kānaka. With these kīpukas, life's cycle will continue to flow. Even if Pele left no kīpukas, life can still grow out of lava. Like the kupukupu fern, which is also represented by the circles and dots. It's my connection to my hula lineage which takes me back to Hilo and Unukupukupu with Kumu Taupouri Tangaro, and the stories of Madam Pele. From there seeds my true and humble respect for Pele. The red triangle represents the red handkerchief that Princess Ruth offered to Pele. It represents her respect and Aloha for her goddess. It also represents Kapi'olani in the house of Pele, proving her determined Aloha for her God, Ke Akua. To me, the main point is GIVE ALOHA to this land, this `āina, and the one you call God, be it Ke Akua or Pele. The 2 stories of the high ali`i wahine show me the line of PONO, or line of balance between dualities. Black/white, Kū/Hina, male/female, God/Pele. In my opinion, the beauty of ANYTHING comes down to the ALOHA, respect, and faith we give...from something small to something huge.Mahalo Ke Akua for the place you gave me to live, Hawai`i!!!
NA`AU WALA`AU DESIGNS.
"Lehua"
The first fallen warrior in a combat battle is called "Lehua," being known as the first fallen fruit... for me, representing death. In laʻau lapaʻau, ʻOhiʻa Lehua is used medicinally. The medicinal part of the plant is the red liko, the new baby sprouts. Gotta be red, and it is used as a tea to build blood. For me, representing life. A dear friend of mine told me that when an ʻohiʻa dies and falls, a new ʻohiʻa grows out of it.
For me, represents balance -- Pono.
The big black and white squares as well as the small black triangle on the bottom represents the liko, the new buds that are medicinal. The black triangle with the white Lehua flower represents the "Lehua", the first fallen fruit. But out of that, facing up, is the yellow Lehua, representing new life, new health. Everything as a whole is balanced, is Pono.
Mahalo Ke Akua for an awesome moʻolelo, for an awesome kiʻi!
"The Men of Kawaili`ula"
This design I dedicate to my halau Kawailiʻula, Kumu Chinky, and hula braddahs. Not being a part of the Merrie Monarch Festival this year (2014) is sad but is necessary. Im not able to give my support for them on stage, but I can give support through other efforts, this being one of them. My hopes is that my braddahs, and even my Kumu, can take something out of this and see what I see, and feel what I feel from your hula this year. I cant really share any more until after Merrie Monarch. But Iʻll let you watch them and see the story for yourself. And maybe you will look back at this design one day after Merrie Monarch and possibly see what I see, and feel what I feel. 
If you watched 2014 Merrie Monarch and seen their performance, I hope you can see what I seen when I visited halau practice and watched their kahiko dance for the first time. Eō Kawailiʻulā!!
Mahalo Ke Akua!

"'Ohi'ohi"


Back in December 2013, I was yearning to go harvest some ʻohe because I had Christmas present ideas. I never like buy a makana....I wanted to make it. One cuz the meaning and love behind it is way mo powerful, and 2, cuz it pushing me to do more cultural things....to do the things our kupuna did everyday for their everyday life. but today we dont do it as much and its not part of our everyday life. We usually only do it when a cultural time is upon for some event or some special day. but why not just cuz its monday, or tuesday, or just another day in our lives? So thats what my naʻau is talking about here. the kiʻi is representing bamboo, but the bamboo is representing the urge to continue my culture; OUR CULTURE! no matter where we stand in our lives and how difficult it may be in todays lifestyle to do cultural things to connect to our kupuna and Ke Akua, this URGE to do something is always the spark to the flame. next step is the flame. next step is to get up and just do it. like me. I said I was gonna harvest bamboo for weeks until I drew this design out and i got the message. The next thing I did was hele-on into the kuahiwis. From that day, Na`au Wala`au Designs began.
Mahalo Ke Akua for these visions and Your manaʻo!!!

The mana (power) is in the kaona (hidden meaning)


"Pono" aka "Pu`u o Mahuka"


This kiʻi is the outcome of what my naʻau felt today and my visit to Puʻu o Mahuka Heiau out Waimea side. Being a sacrificial heiau, I had no idea what kine of mana to expect. Walking around the parameter of the stone walls, I can only imagine when this heiau was in full swing and functioning.I can see these kānaka and aliʻi worshiping their akua Kū and can only imagine how hard their lives were, having to sacrifice people and seeing bloodshed, especially of their own people. I know I wouldnʻt be able to handle that.So I am very grateful that the mana I felt today is the opposite of those times; beauty and peace.However, in being a healer, I have learned through moʻolelo that you can't only know how to restore and heal life. You need to also know how to destroy and take away life. So being a new student of this art work, it was a great experience visiting a place of such mana; mana that has a great deal to do with healing.The main thing that stood out to me today were: the tī leaf; the rocks wrapped in tī leaf and placed on the wall; and my hoʻokupu. ​Mahalo Ke Akua for the continuing journey You take me on!!

"China's Bird Nest"


This design pretty much sums up my feeling from a trip i just returned from. I just came back from a trip to China for work. Aside from work, we had to fortunate opportunity to visit a small portion of the Great Wall of China. To get to this part, we had to leave the busy city of Beijing and had to drive through more rural areas and slum looking towns. Everywhere there were trees, but most of them were bare of leaves. Just skeletons of trees. Rows and rows, one after another. Its winter time and its about 20-30 degrees outside, so vegetation is harsh. And as you gaze from tree to tree, you see fat bird nests that rest between the branches. As we get closer to the Great Wall and continue to drive through the struggling town, I see an old couple cutting a branch off a bare tree, assuming it is for firewood. And I see stacks of wood next to peoples houses. I then really realize the hard life that is. How easy I have it and how fortunate I am. I realize that I take that for granted. And then we get to the Great Wall and I got to experience something that has come from a time where hard-ship was prevalent. However, it is still here with us today. It stands as strong as it did thousands of years ago.The manaʻo behind this image:The black diagonal lines are created by black triangles. These triangles represent the rows of trees. This represents the reality of this country... to me. There are a lot of poverty and struggle. But the government, big buildings and businesses donʻt care about except money and power. People struggle everyday to get food on the table, or wood in the fireplace so they wonʻt freeze. But they do it. And experiencing the Great Wall was like feeling the struggle those warriors went through in building the wall. Fighting to stay alive. Like the bird that builds the nest. Fighting for your life, but also your children's, and others around you. Just always fighting to survive. The row of white triangles represent the nests in the trees.  ​Mahalo Ke Akua for my experiences!!!

"Sydney"

This is an expression to my fortuante opportunities to travel around the world with as a dancer for the Hawaiian Airlines Promotion Team.  I feel that with these opportunities come with a responsibility to share the richest experience of Hawai`i.  The squares represents both the windows of the airplane as well as the windows of the hotel room.  A benefit of traveling with the airlines includes having the chance to stay at different hotels.  The lines represent the journey traveled, as well as the wheels of the airplane.  This allows me to experience different lifestyles and cultures.  This designs expresses my gratitude and humility for having the opportunities to share a piece of my culture with other cultures.
Mahalo Ke Akua!!!

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"Kaʻiwi Coast"


Story soon to be posted!

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